Considering Declaring War On Your Pubic Hair?

Many of us have declared war on our pubic hair.  In the last 10 years, the hair removal industry has grown tremendously, especially genital hair removal. Cultural trends spawned by bikinis and thongs, certain hairless actors and actresses, a desire to return to childhood,  a misguided attempt at hygiene, or being more attractive to a partner, have all been motivations for this huge war.  

Surely us humans are not so naive as to be susceptible to fashion trends and biases. Unfortunately we are (I raise my hand), and unfortunately, we will never win this war.

Research has shown that surgeons have found that shaving a body part prior to surgery increases the opportunity for onsite infections. It doesn’t matter how fancy or expensive the method of hair removal –  razor blades, electric shavers, tweezers, waxing, depilatories, electrolysis – they all can be harmful.

Here are the  things you should know about pubic hair removal.

  • It naturally irritates and inflames the hair follicles left behind, leaving microscopic open wounds.
  • Frequent hair removal is necessary to stay smooth, causing regular irritation of the shaved or waxed area.
  • When that irritation is combined with the warm moist environment of the genitals, it becomes a happy area for some of the nastiest of bacterial infections.
  • Some clinicians have found that freshly shaved pubic areas and genitals are also more vulnerable to herpes infections and other STIs as well due to the microscopic wounds being exposed to viruses carried by mouth or genitals.

I, too, was guilty of removing my hair down there until I kept suffering from the incessant nightmare of ingrown hairs. It was explained to me how unhealthy it was that I was removing the hair because it is a form of protection for my parts. It expressed that pubic hair does have a purpose,  providing cushion against friction that can cause skin abrasion and injury,  protection from bacteria and other unwanted pathogens, and is the visible result of long awaited adolescent hormones, certainly nothing to be ashamed of or embarrassed about. I was told me if I must remove hair from there, I should trim it low but not completely off.

So maybe it is time for us to declare a truce in the war on pubic hair, and allow it to stay right where it belongs? Until bikini spider legs appear.

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I Simply love Turmeric… One of the Best Herbs for Fighting Dis-ease….

Turmeric* may not initially ring a bell but you’ve probably eaten it many times.  The west is finally catching up to traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda (the traditional medicine of India) in recognizing turmeric as a super spice in treating a range of health problems—joint pain, eczema, cancer, and Alzheimer’s, just to name a few. It can also be used topically to treat acne, hyper-pigmentation, wrinkles and even remove unwanted hair.

Medical researchers at the U.S National Institute of Health are said to be currently conducting studies to investigate the special qualities of this spice – to fight a host of diseases. And research is revealing far more serious restorative qualities of this yellow spice.

History of the Spice

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Turmeric was traditionally called Indian saffron since its deep yellow-orange color is similar to that of the prized saffron. It has been used throughout history as a condiment, healing remedy and textile dye.

Turmeric comes from the root of the Curcuma longa plant and has a tough brown skin and a deep orange flesh. This herb has a very interesting taste and aroma. Its flavor is peppery, warm and bitter while its fragrance is mild yet slightly reminiscent of orange and ginger, to which it is related.

Turmeric is native to Indonesia and southern India, where it has been harvested for more than 5,000 years. It has served an important role in many traditional cultures throughout the East, including being a revered member of the Ayurvedic pharmacopeia. While Arab traders introduced it into Europe in the 13th century, it has only recently become popular in Western cultures. Much of its recent popularity is owed to the recent research that has highlighted its therapeutic properties. The leading commercial producers of turmeric include India, Indonesia, China, the Philippines, Taiwan, Haiti and Jamaica.

Uses for Turmeric

Health claims for turmeric include treatment of the following conditions:

  • prostrate health
  • arthritis
  • eczema
  • heartburn
  • ulcers
  • gallstones
  • kidney stones
  • inflammation

Turmeric is also used to stimulate digestion, boost liver function, and regulate menstruation. Additionally, some proponents suggest that turmeric can help prevent cancer.

Benefits of Turmeric

While a number of animal-based and test-tube studies have shown that turmeric may offer a host of health benefits, few studies have explored turmeric’s effects on human health. Here’s a look at some key findings from the available research on turmeric:

 

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1) Turmeric and Cancer

Curcumin shows promise as a means of reducing breast cancer risk among women undergoing hormone replacement therapy during menopause, according to an animal study published in 2009. In tests on rats, researchers found that treatment with curcumin inhibited the growth of progestin-accelerated tumors (a common health risk for women receiving combined estrogen and progestin hormone replacement therapy).

If you’re considering the use of any natural remedies in combination with hormone replacement therapy, make sure to consult your health-care provider before beginning treatment.

2) Turmeric and Alzheimer’s Disease

When paired with vitamin D, curcumin may help protect against Alzheimer’s disease. In a 2009 study of nine Alzheimer’s patients and four people without the disease, investigators determined that a combination of curcumin and vitamin D may prompt the immune system to clear the brain of amyloid beta (a substance that forms the brain plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease).

3) Turmeric and Diabetes

Tests on mice indicate that curcumin may help keep blood sugar in check and, in turn, reduce risk of type 2 diabetes. In their 2008 study, scientists also found that turmeric may help tame obesity-related inflammation.

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4) Turmeric and Liver Health

In a 2007 study on rats, scientists discovered that curcumin can protect against liver damage. Study results suggest that curcumin can help curb the production of certain proteins known to promote inflammation.

5) Osteoarthritis

Turmeric may help relieve the symptoms of osteoarthritis because of its ability to reduce pain and disability.

6) Menstrual problems of Woman

For women who experience monthly menstrual cramps, try using turmeric extract or bitters twice daily for two weeks prior to expected menstruation. Turmeric is an antispasmodic to smooth muscles so it reduces digestive and menstrual cramping. It should reduce the severity of pain, if not ease them completely. Certainly, diet and standard of living have a reflective influence on the menstrual cycle, but turmeric is a great addition.

7) Bacterial Infection / Wounds

Turmeric is useful as an external antibiotic in preventing bacterial infection in wounds.

8) Eye Disorder

Curcumin may prove to be as effective as corticosteroids in the uveitis (inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye between the sclera – white outer coat of the eye and the retina – the back of the eye) the type of eye disorder.

9) Other Health Disorders

Turmeric is anti-inflammatory to the mucous membranes, which coat the throat, lungs, stomach and intestines. Regular use of turmeric can benefit from Colitis, Crohn’s disease, diarrhea, and post-giardia or post salmonella conditions. The itching and inflammation that accompanies hemorrhoids and anal fissures can reduce by use of turmeric. Turmeric can also benefit skin conditions including: eczema, psoriasis and acne, for those it is potent detoxifier.

How to Use Turmeric

Turmeric is widely available in supplement form. You can also increase your turmeric intake by using curry powder in your cooking.

Since few clinical trials have studied turmeric’s health effects, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine cautions against using turmeric to treat any health condition. If you’re considering the use of turmeric supplements for health purposes, make sure to consult your physician before starting your supplement regimen.

Is Turmeric Safe?

Although turmeric is generally considered safe, high-doses or long-term use may cause indigestion. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine advises people with gallbladder disease to avoid using turmeric supplements, as they may worsen this condition.

*Too much Turmeric can cause numbness in your mouth, tongue and throat. 

One Glass of Wine per day….

Need some reasons to feel even better about that after-work glass of wine? Every year, there are increasingly positive reports on the health benefits of red wine.

Wine has always been a staple in the human diet. In fact, scientists have documented red wine as far back as 5400 B.C. But just where do these health benefits come from you might ask?

After all this cooking, some of us may need a glass of wine! IS THIS YOUR GLASS?? LOL! But seriously, wine does have great health benefits. 

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Resveratrol? Polyphenols?

Antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart. A polyphenol called resveratrol is one substance in red wine that’s gotten a lot of attention. Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound found in grapes, red wine, purple grape juice, peanuts, and some berries. Scientists became interested in exploring potential health benefits of resveratrol when its presence was reported in red wine, and seemed to be consistently connected with reductions in coronary heart disease risk and longevity.

Here are just a few of the healthy things that resveratrol can do for you:

Increase Longevity. Resveratrol has been shown to increase lifespan in animal studies.

Improve Brain Health. Resveratrol has been shown to protect against Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Support Heart Health. Red wine has been shown to reduce the risk of heart and cardiovascular disease thanks to the resveratrol and other antioxidants it contains.

Protect Against Lung Cancer. Researchers from the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain found that each glass of red wine per day reduced the risk of lung cancer by 13%.

Protect Against Prostate Cancer. Red wine has been shown to reduce men’s overall risk of prostate cancer by 50% and the risk of the most aggressive forms of prostate cancer by 60%.

Protect Against Breast Cancer. Moderate consumption of red wine is believed to lower the risk of breast cancer. However, drinking more than 1 or 2 alcoholic drinks per day appears to increase the risk of breast cancer in women, so moderation is key.

Prevent Colds. Researchers in Spain found that people who drank more than two glasses of red wine per day have 44% fewer colds than people who abstained.

Decrease Inflammation. Resveratrol has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, which helps overall physical health since many diseases and ailments can be attributed to inflammation.

Lower Cholesterol. Resveratrol has been found in studies to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol, while another ingredient in red wine, saponins, have cholesterol lowering properties as well. In addition, red wine has been shown to increase levels of HDL (good) cholesterol and protect against artery damage.

In addition to the above health benefits, studies show that red wine can also improve the quality of your sleep. Red wine, especially Cabernet Sauvignon, Chianti, and Merlot, contains melatonin. Melatonin regulates the body clock, so drinking a glass of red wine before bed may help you sleep. Melatonin is also an antioxidant, which means it also has anti-aging and cancer preventative properties.

Important Things To Keep In Mind About Red Wine…

While the news about red wine might sound great if you enjoy a glass of red wine with your evening meal, doctors are wary of encouraging anyone to start drinking alcohol. That’s because too much alcohol can have many harmful effects on your body.

Moderation is key. Drinking too much alcohol has been linked to several conditions, including cancer. Men should drink no more than 2-3 glasses of red wine a day, and women should limit their consumption to 1-2 glasses a night.

More research is needed. Although resveratrol can inhibit the growth of cancer cells in culture and in some animal models, more extensive research is needed regarding the influence of resveratrol in cancer prevention in humans.

Seasonal Health Benefits of Persimmon

The persimmon fruit is really not a fruit but a berry. Persimmon nutrition is especially healthful due to the many phytonutrients that are also anti-oxidants.

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Persimmon’s native country is China, where it was nicknamed “Apple of the Orient“. From China, persimmon diffused into Japan, where it still plays a primary role in the Japanese cuisine, and then all over the world.

Persimmon (Diospyros—Greek for “fruit of the gods“) is really not a fruit, but a large, round, succulent berry, with a smooth, thin peel of variable color (from yellow to brilliant orange), depending on the degree of ripening. The pulp is soft, creamy, almost gelatinous when the fruit is fully ripe.

A ripe persimmon tastes very sweet and has a “honey flavor”. Some parts of the flesh may turn brown but this is not because it has turned bad, but is actually the sugar in the fruit.

There are generally two types of persimmons—astringent and non-astringent. The astringent persimmon contains high level of tannin before softening, which makes the fruit inedible. Whereas the non-astringent persimmon loses the tannin sooner making the fruit edible even while firm.

The shape of the fruit varies from spherical to acorn to flattened or even squarish. The color varies from light yellow-orange to dark orange-red. The size of a persimmon can vary from about the size of small orange to as big as a grapefruit, depending on the variety.

Persimmons are usually not juiced but are eaten on its own, like a mango, or pureed or for making smoothies. They are highly fibrous, delicious and nutritious.

Parasite Defense

Parasite Defense

Nutritional Benefits

Persimmon is an excellent source of a few known phytonutrients:

  • cryptoxantin that gives it the brilliant orange color
  • catechins, gallocatechins are anti-oxidants from the flavonoids family, known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-hemorrhagic properties
  • anti-tumor compound betulinic acid
  • beta carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthinare anti-oxidants that help neutralize free-radicals and prevent oxidation and cancer

Persimmon is rich in vitamin A, C, the B vitamins. In the minerals department, it is dense-packed with calcium, potassium, iron, manganese, phosphorus and copper.

Health Benefits

Persimmon does have laxative and diuretic properties and is particularly recommended for people suffering from liver problems. It is also an energy-dense fruit. That’s why it is recommended for children, people playing sports and people who are physically or mentally tired.

Below are various therapeutic and healthy properties of this very sweet fruit:

Cold and flu:  Thanks to its content in vitamin C, persimmon is highly effective in enhancing the immune system function and can help relieve the symptoms of flu and cold, as well as many other infectious or inflammatory conditions.

Constipation:  Due to its high content in fiber and water, persimmon does have excellent laxative properties that can be a powerful natural remedy for constipation.

Diuretic effect:  Persimmon does have excellent diuretic properties, due to its high content in potassium and calcium. Eating a persimmon a day is an effective way to prevent or relieve water retention. Daily consumption of persimmon is better than the use of diuretic drugs, since persimmon does not cause potassium loss which is associated with many known diuretics.

High blood pressure:  Helps reduce high blood pressure and prevent many heart conditions associated with hypertension.

Liver health and body detoxification:  Persimmon is an excellent source of anti-oxidants which play a key role in liver health and body detoxification. Anti-oxidants help neutralize toxins and other harmful substances in the body, prevent and treat the damages caused by free-radicals.

Natural energizer:  Persimmons are highly digestible fruits and also provide a lot of readily available energy (in the form of sugars) to sustain any energy-requiring activity. That’s why they are particularly recommended for children and people who practice sports or other physical activities.

Stress, tiredness and fatigue:  Due to their high content in sugars and potassium, persimmon juice can help reinforce the body with energy and relieve the symptoms of stress, fatigue and tiredness without the need to use special energetic and nutritional supplements.

Parasimmon Juice Cleanse

Consumption

To check if persimmons are ripe, lightly depress the fruit. If it’s hard, it’s not yet ripe, do not eat unless you’re certain that you’ve got the non-astringent variety.

Fully ripe persimmons are soft to the touch, very sweet and creamy that they can be eaten as they are. Simply cut them into two halves and eat the pulp with a spoon. They can also be used to prepare delicious sauces, creams, jams, jellies and smoothies.

To speed up the ripening process, put persimmons out at room temperature. Storing them in the fridge will slow down the ripening process, keeping them for longer.

A Healthy Diet for Vegan, Veggitarian and Pescatarian Athletes

It’s a common misconception that people who regularly spend many hours doing intense, energy-draining workouts need a massive amount of animal protein to stay strong and healthy. Just look at the connection between the paleo and CrossFit communities!  However, it is important to remember that not every body is the same. A diet high in animal protein may give some athletes the energy they need to keep going at the gym, but others will thrive just as well on a vegan diet.

To stay in top shape, athletes need a diet high in protein and carbohydrates. Your body used the carbohydrates to fuel your workout and the protein to retain muscle mass and aid the recovery process post-workout. Of course, this could mean eating a slice of toast before you hit the gym and a juicy steak afterward, but it doesn’t have to. Vegans can also sufficiently refuel their bodies pos-workout with plant-based proteins.

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It’s also a common misperception that green vegetables contain no protein. According to Dr. Joel Fuhrman, the following vegetables have high protein content and are an excellent choice for a post-workout meal.

Protein content in vegetables (3 cups of each)

  • Broccoli rabe – 15 grams
  • Spinach – 15 grams
  • Asparagus – 12 grams
  • Bok Choy – 9 grams
  • Swiss Chard – 9 grams

Making a spinach smoothie or stir-frying some broccoli rabe or asparagus with a healthy grain after a hard workout will keep athletes in great shape. There are also several beans, nuts, seeds and whole grains you can add to your post-workout meal for protein and to satisfy your appetite.

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Protein content in beans, nuts, seeds and grains

  • Tofu (1/2 block) – 22.5 grams
  • Tempeh (1/2 block) 20 grams
  • Lentils (1 cup, cooked) – 18 grams
  • Edamame (1 cup) – 17 grams
  • Oats (1/2 cup dry) – 13 grams
  • Pumpkin Seeds (1/4 cup) – 8.5 grams

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Compare this to how much protein is typically found in meat and animal products:

Protein in Animal Products

  • ½ fillet of Salmon – 39 grams
  • 1 cup of chicken meat – 35 grams
  • 3 ounces of steak – 20 grams
  • 1 ounce of cheddar cheese – 7 grams
  • 1 hard boiled egg – 6 grams
Salmon and Arugula Wrap

Salmon and Arugula Wrap

Athletes who follow a diet heavy in animal products are likely to ingest more protein in a smaller portion of food. Vegan athletes simply need to eat a larger quantity of plants at each sitting.  For example 3 cups of spinach and a ½ block of tofu contain about as much protein ½ of a salmon filet.

It’s also important to remember that in the case of protein, more is not always better. On average, a serious athlete needs about .6 times their body weight in grams of protein per day. This means a marathon runner weighing in at 150 pounds needs and average of 90 grams of protein per day to stay in competing shape. For a vegan athlete, a typical daily menu could look like this:

Breakfast

Tofu scramble with ½ block tofu and 1.5 cups of spinach – 30 grams protein

Lunch

1 cup of lentils with 2 cups of broccoli rabe – 22 grams

Afternoon Snack

¼ cup pumpkins seeds – 8.5 grams

Dinner

½ block of tempeh with 1 cup of bok choy – 29 grams

Of course, most athletes will need more calories than this and should be adding other vegetables and whole grains into their meals, as well. An athlete who eats a lot of animal protein will easily go over 90 grams per day, in which case the excess protein is processed and excreted. Your body isn’t able to store excess protein in the body for later use.

It is completely possible for highly active and competitive athletes to survive and thrive on a plant-based diet. If you are an athlete and find that you feel better when you don’t eat animal products, experimenting with a vegan diet could be the answer!

I Love Turmeric, and seems SCIENCE CONFIRMS TURMERIC AS EFFECTIVE AS 14 DRUGS…Take peek

Turmeric As An Effective Holistic Healing Remedy

Turmeric is one the most thoroughly researched plants in existence today. Its medicinal properties and components (primarily curcumin) have been the subject of over 5600 peer-reviewed and published bio-medical studies.

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In fact, our five-year long research project on this sacred plant has revealed over 600 potential preventive and therapeutic applications, as well as 175 distinct beneficial physiological effects.

This entire database of 1,585 ncbi-hyperlinked turmeric abstracts can be downloaded as a PDF at our Downloadable Turmeric Document page, and acquired either as a retail item or with 200 GMI-tokens, for those of you who are already are members and receive them automatically each month.

Given the sheer density of research performed on this remarkable spice, it is no wonder that a growing number of studies have concluded that it compares favorably to a variety of conventional medications, including:

  • Lipitor/Atorvastatin(cholesterol medication): A 2008 study published in the journal Drugs in R & D found that a standardized preparation of curcuminoids from Turmeric compared favorably to the drug atorvastatin (trade name Lipitor) on endothelial dysfunction, the underlying pathology of the blood vessels that drives atherosclerosis, in association with reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetic patients. [i] [For addition curcumin and ‘high cholesterol’ research – 8 abstracts]
  • Corticosteroids (steroid medications): A 1999 study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research found that the primary polyphenol in turmeric, the saffron colored pigment known as curcumin, compared favorably to steroids in the management of chronic anterior uveitis, an inflammatory eye disease.[ii] A 2008 study published in Critical Care Medicine found that curcumin compared favorably to the corticosteroid drug dexamethasone in the animal model as an alternative therapy for protecting lung transplantation-associated injury by down-regulating inflammatory genes.[iii] An earlier 2003 study published in Cancer Letters found the same drug also compared favorably to dexamethasone in a lung ischaemia-repurfusion injury model.[iv] [for additional curcumin and inflammation research – 52 abstracts]
  • Prozac/Fluoxetine & Imipramine (antidepressants): A 2011 study published in the journal Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica found that curcumin compared favorably to both drugs in reducing depressive behavior in an animal model.[v] [for additional curcumin and depression research – 5 abstracts]
  • Aspirin (blood thinner): A 1986 in vitro and ex vivo study published in the journal Arzneimittelforschung found that curcumin has anti-platelet and prostacyclin modulating effects compared to aspirin, indicating it may have value in patients prone to vascular thrombosis and requiring anti-arthritis therapy.[vi] [for additional curcumin and anti-plateletresearch]
  • Anti-inflammatory Drugs: A 2004 study published in the journal Oncogene found that curcumin (as well as resveratrol) were effective alternatives to the drugs aspirin, ibuprofen, sulindac, phenylbutazone, naproxen, indomethacin, diclofenac, dexamethasone, celecoxib, and tamoxifen in exerting anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activity against tumor cells.[vii] [for additional curcumin and anti-proliferative research – 15 abstracts]
  • Oxaliplatin (chemotherapy drug): A 2007 study published in the International Journal of Cancer found that curcumin compares favorably with oxaliplatin as an antiproliferative agent in colorectal cell lines.[viii] [for additional curcumin and colorectal cancer research – 52 abstracts]
  • Metformin (diabetes drug): A 2009 study published in the journal Biochemitry and Biophysical Research Community explored how curcumin might be valuable in treating diabetes, finding that it activates AMPK (which increases glucose uptake) and suppresses gluconeogenic gene expression (which suppresses glucose production in the liver) in hepatoma cells. Interestingly, they found curcumin to be 500 times to 100,000 times (in the form known as tetrahydrocurcuminoids(THC)) more potent than metformin in activating AMPK and its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). [ix]

Another way in which turmeric and its components reveal their remarkable therapeutic properties is in research on drug resistant- and multi-drug resistant cancers. We have two sections on our site dedicated to researching natural and integrative therapies on these topics, and while there are dozens of substances with demonstrable efficacy against these chemotherapy- and radiation-resistant cancers, curcumin tops both lists:

We have found no less than 54 studies indicating that curcumin can induce cell death or sensitize drug-resistant cancer cell lines to conventional treatment.[x]

We have identified 27 studies on curcumin’s ability to either induce cell death or sensitize multi-drug resistant cancer cell lines to conventional treatment.[xi]

Considering how strong a track record turmeric (curcumin) has, having been used as both food and medicine in a wide range of cultures, for thousands of years, a strong argument can be made for using curcumin as a drug alternative or adjuvant in cancer treatment.

Or, better yet, use certified organic (non-irradiated) turmeric in lower culinary doses on a daily basis so that heroic doses won’t be necessary later in life after a serious disease sets in. Nourishing yourself, rather than self-medicating with ‘nutraceuticals,’ should be the goal of a healthy diet. [learn more at Sayer Ji’s new collaborative project EATomology]

Resources

Source: Green Med Info via True Activist